Interview with Wendell Potter and Nick Penniman

Wendell Potter The First Congress: How James Madison, George Washington, and a Group of Extraordinary Men Invented the Government

Wendell Potter

author of "The First Congress: How James Madison, George Washington, and a Group of Extraordinary Men Invented the Government"
Nick Penniman The First Congress: How James Madison, George Washington, and a Group of Extraordinary Men Invented the Government

Nick Penniman

author of "The First Congress: How James Madison, George Washington, and a Group of Extraordinary Men Invented the Government"
John A. Girardi

John A. Girardi

Co-Host & Partner at Girardi | Keese

Wendell Potter, author of "The First Congress: How James Madison, George Washington, and a Group of Extraordinary Men Invented the Government"

Wendell Potter's Website

Following a 20-year career as a corporate public relations executive, Potter left his position as head of communications for CIGNA, one of the nation’s largest health insurers, to show the world the dark inner workings of the insurance industry. He has testified before Senate and House committees, briefed several members of Congress and their staffs, appeared with lawmakers at several press conferences, spoken at more than 100 public forums, and has been the subject of numerous articles in the U.S. and foreign media. His new book is called Deadly Spin: An Insurance Company Insider Speaks Out on How Corporate PR Is Killing Health Care and Deceiving Americans.

The Book: "The First Congress: How James Madison, George Washington, and a Group of Extraordinary Men Invented the Government"

ISBN: 1451691939

Get the book

The little known story of perhaps the most productive Congress in US history, the First Federal Congress of 1789–1791.

The First Congress was the most important in US history, says prizewinning author and historian Fergus Bordewich, because it established how our government would actually function. Had it failed—as many at the time feared it would—it’s possible that the United States as we know it would not exist today.

The Constitution was a broad set of principles. It was left to the members of the First Congress and President George Washington to create the machinery that would make the government work. Fortunately, James Madison, John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, and others less well known today, rose to the occasion. During two years of often fierce political struggle, they passed the first ten amendments to the Constitution; they resolved bitter regional rivalries to choose the site of the new national capital; they set in place the procedure for admitting new states to the union; and much more. But the First Congress also confronted some issues that remain to this day: the conflict between states’ rights and the powers of national government; the proper balance between legislative and executive power; the respective roles of the federal and state judiciaries; and funding the central government. Other issues, such as slavery, would fester for decades before being resolved.

The First Congress tells the dramatic story of the two remarkable years when Washington, Madison, and their dedicated colleagues struggled to successfully create our government, an achievement that has lasted to the present day.

Nick Penniman, author of "The First Congress: How James Madison, George Washington, and a Group of Extraordinary Men Invented the Government"

Nick Penniman's Website

Nick Penniman is Executive Editor of TomPaine.com, a public interest journal inspired by Thomas Paine, author ofCommon Sense and The Rights of Man. Before joining TomPaine.com, he was Director of Moving Ideas Network and an associate editor of The American Prospect magazine. He also served as the director of the Alliance for Democracy, a national grassroots organization that focuses on corporate globalization and campaign finance reform. He formerly served as the editor of the Lincoln Journal, a weekly newspaper published in Massachusetts, and headed an investigative reporting team for the Community Newspaper Company. He grew up in St. Louis, MO, and now lives in Silver Spring, MD.

The Book: "The First Congress: How James Madison, George Washington, and a Group of Extraordinary Men Invented the Government"

ISBN: 1451691939

Get the book

The little known story of perhaps the most productive Congress in US history, the First Federal Congress of 1789–1791.

The First Congress was the most important in US history, says prizewinning author and historian Fergus Bordewich, because it established how our government would actually function. Had it failed—as many at the time feared it would—it’s possible that the United States as we know it would not exist today.

The Constitution was a broad set of principles. It was left to the members of the First Congress and President George Washington to create the machinery that would make the government work. Fortunately, James Madison, John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, and others less well known today, rose to the occasion. During two years of often fierce political struggle, they passed the first ten amendments to the Constitution; they resolved bitter regional rivalries to choose the site of the new national capital; they set in place the procedure for admitting new states to the union; and much more. But the First Congress also confronted some issues that remain to this day: the conflict between states’ rights and the powers of national government; the proper balance between legislative and executive power; the respective roles of the federal and state judiciaries; and funding the central government. Other issues, such as slavery, would fester for decades before being resolved.

The First Congress tells the dramatic story of the two remarkable years when Washington, Madison, and their dedicated colleagues struggled to successfully create our government, an achievement that has lasted to the present day.

John A. Girardi, Co-Host & Partner at Girardi | Keese

John A. Girardi's Website

John Girardi, Partner at Girardi Keese, is one of America's Finest Trial Lawyers and our Co-Host, as always, brings out the most important key elements to the success of today's guests. He and his firm have been dedicated to working hard and getting the best possible recovery for its clients. Girardi Keese's mission is to provide aggressive representation of individuals and businesses who have been injured in sous way, whether by physical harm, property damage, damage to business, or damage to economic interests. Girardi & Keese has two offices in California: Downtown Los Angeles and San Bernardino.